A fluorimetric assay has been used to determine the DNA content of amoebae of Dictyostelium discoideum during growth and development. Amoebae grown in axenic culture tended to be multinucleate and had a greater DNA content than amoebae grown with a bacterial substrate, which were mononucleate. During the first 10 h of development there was little change in the DNA content of amoebae grown with a bacterial substrate, but the average DNA content per cell in amoebae grown axenically decreased as the amoebae became virtually mononucleate. Amoebae at 10 h development that had been harvested during exponential axenic growth were divided into two populations by countercurrent distribution in a polymer two-phase system. DNA content indicated that one population was largely in the G2-phase of the cell cycle, whereas the other population was largely in the G1-phase. Similar results were obtained at 10 h development with amoebae harvested during the stationary phase of axenic growth, although these amoebae start development all in the G2-phase of the cell cycle. Spores had a low DNA content, indicating that they were in G1-phase. It is proposed that all amoebae in G2-phase after early development differentiate, after mitosis, into spores and that stalk cells are formed from amoebae that remain in G1-phase after 10 h development.

This content is only available as a PDF.
You do not currently have access to this content.