Human atherosclerotic plaque contains a partially characterized range of normal and oxidized lipids formed mainly from free and esterified cholesterol and phospholipids, some of which can be located in macrophage-derived ‘foam’ cells. Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is often considered as an important event leading to subsequent foam-cell development, which may also include enhanced cell survival and/or proliferation. The active component(s) in oxidized LDL (ox.LDL) causing macrophage proliferation is debated. We report here that the lipid component of ox.LDL can promote macrophage survival and DNA synthesis, the latter response showing a synergistic effect in the presence of low concentrations of macrophage colony-stimulating factor. 7-Ketocholesterol showed some stimulation of macrophage DNA synthesis whereas hypochlorite-oxidized (i.e. apolipoprotein B-oxidized) LDL did not. Plaque-derived lipids could enhance macrophage survival. It has not been proven that LDL in lesions is oxidized sufficiently to be the dominant source of sterols in vivo or to be able to induce macrophage growth in vitro or in vivo; it has been suggested that aggregation of modified LDL in vivo is an important step in the deposition of intracellular lipid. We found that aggregation of lightly oxidized LDL potentiated dramatically its ability to stimulate macrophage DNA synthesis, indicating that extensive oxidation of LDL is not required for this response in vitro and perhaps in vivo.

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