Volume 32 Part 4 (2004) 601–605

Owing to a technical problem at the printing stage, the colours for Figure 2 as featured on page 604 were misprinted. The printed version of this Figure should have appeared as shown below (together with the associated Figure legend). The online version of the Figure was not affected.

Ribosomal small-subunit proteins containing chloroplast unique domains

Figure 2
Ribosomal small-subunit proteins containing chloroplast unique domains

The bacterial 30 S ribosomal subunit (PDB 1J5E; [48]) is shown from the solvent side. rRNA (light green) and most of the proteins (light blue) are shown as backbone trace. Ribosomal proteins S2 (yellow), S3 (green) and S5 (blue) are shown as surfaces. Marked in red on each of these subunits is the residue where the unique chloroplast protein domain would be connected. For perspective, the additional domains from these three proteins would equal an additional S2, two additional S3s and three additional S5s. Arrows mimic the travel of mRNA around the back of the neck of the 30 S subunit, with S3 and S5 proteins flanking the site where the mRNA leaves the ribosome. GRASP [49], Molscript and POV-ray were used for creating this Figure.

Figure 2
Ribosomal small-subunit proteins containing chloroplast unique domains

The bacterial 30 S ribosomal subunit (PDB 1J5E; [48]) is shown from the solvent side. rRNA (light green) and most of the proteins (light blue) are shown as backbone trace. Ribosomal proteins S2 (yellow), S3 (green) and S5 (blue) are shown as surfaces. Marked in red on each of these subunits is the residue where the unique chloroplast protein domain would be connected. For perspective, the additional domains from these three proteins would equal an additional S2, two additional S3s and three additional S5s. Arrows mimic the travel of mRNA around the back of the neck of the 30 S subunit, with S3 and S5 proteins flanking the site where the mRNA leaves the ribosome. GRASP [49], Molscript and POV-ray were used for creating this Figure.