Biochemical Society Transactions (2018) volume 46(4) 807-816, https://doi.org/10.1042/BST20170351

The wrong units of thickness were presented in Figure 3B of the published article. Figure 3 is presented here with were the correct units (nanometres).

Data collection schemes for cryo-tomography.

Figure 3.
Data collection schemes for cryo-tomography.

(A) The traditional continuous tilt scheme is shown on the left panel, with data collection starting from high angle and reaching the opposite tilt through sequential increments. The recently implemented dose-symmetric scheme starts at zero, and ‘swings’ to increasingly higher tilts. (B) A schematic view of how the dose-symmetric scheme transfers high frequencies with optimal efficiency, making it ideal for improving SNR by dose compensation and obtain high resolutions by STA. At low tilts (left panel), high-frequency transfer is highest due to electrons traversing the specimen at its thinnest. Since low tilts are the initial stages of the tilt acquisition, the electron dose accumulated is low, and high-resolution features are less damaged. At high tilts, towards the end of the tomogram collection, high-resolution features are damaged by the beam, and the increased thickness of the tilted specimen is such that the transfer of high-frequency information is weak.

Figure 3.
Data collection schemes for cryo-tomography.

(A) The traditional continuous tilt scheme is shown on the left panel, with data collection starting from high angle and reaching the opposite tilt through sequential increments. The recently implemented dose-symmetric scheme starts at zero, and ‘swings’ to increasingly higher tilts. (B) A schematic view of how the dose-symmetric scheme transfers high frequencies with optimal efficiency, making it ideal for improving SNR by dose compensation and obtain high resolutions by STA. At low tilts (left panel), high-frequency transfer is highest due to electrons traversing the specimen at its thinnest. Since low tilts are the initial stages of the tilt acquisition, the electron dose accumulated is low, and high-resolution features are less damaged. At high tilts, towards the end of the tomogram collection, high-resolution features are damaged by the beam, and the increased thickness of the tilted specimen is such that the transfer of high-frequency information is weak.