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Keywords: Archaea
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Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2020) 48 (6): 2359–2376.
Published: 10 December 2020
...Ekaterina Zabolotnaya; Ioanna Mela; Robert M. Henderson; Nicholas P. Robinson The bacterial SbcC/SbcD DNA repair proteins were identified over a quarter of a century ago. Following the subsequent identification of the homologous Mre11/Rad50 complex in the eukaryotes and archaea, it has become clear...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2020) 48 (3): 1035–1046.
Published: 03 June 2020
... of the proteins inserted into those membranes. They are synthesized by two main pathways, the so-called eukaryotic pathway, exclusively found in mitochondria, and the prokaryotic pathway, present in most bacteria and archaea. In the prokaryotic pathway, the first and the third reactions are catalyzed...
Includes: Supplementary data
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2019) 47 (6): 1895–1907.
Published: 10 December 2019
...Andrea Söllinger; Tim Urich Research on methanogenic Archaea has experienced a revival, with many novel lineages of methanogens recently being found through cultivation and suggested via metagenomics approaches, respectively. Most of these lineages comprise Archaea (potentially) capable...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2019) 47 (1): 461–468.
Published: 19 February 2019
... and this necessitates a tight regulation of transcription and especially assured termination events in order to prevent read-through into downstream coding regions and the accumulation of antisense transcripts. archaea Haloferax volcanii transcription termination Pro- and eukaryotes use multisubunit RNA...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2019) 47 (1): 351–356.
Published: 15 January 2019
... published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society and distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CC BY) . archaea DNA replication primase As with the rest of the DNA replication machinery, the archaeal DNA primases have an orthologous relationship...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (6): 1449–1458.
Published: 20 November 2013
...-BY) ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ ) which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Archaea clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats spacer (CRISPR spacer) pMGB1 Sulfolobus Sulfolobus...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (1): 427–431.
Published: 29 January 2013
.... By contrast, the proteins/genes involved in CoA biosynthesis in archaea have not been fully clarified, and much has to be learned before we obtain a general understanding of how this molecule is synthesized. In the present paper, we review the current status of the research on CoA biosynthesis in the archaea...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (1): 432–435.
Published: 29 January 2013
.... volcanii N-glycosylation will continue to reveal new twists on this universal post-translational modification. The future indeed looks sweet. Molecular Biology of Archaea 3: An Independent Meeting held at the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Marburg, Germany, 2–4 July 2012...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (1): 436–442.
Published: 29 January 2013
... evelyne.marguet@igmors.u-psud.fr or forterre@pasteur.fr ). 2 11 2012 © The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 Biochemical Society 2013 Archaea extracellular membrane vesicle hyperthermophile nanopod nanotube oligopeptide-binding protein A (OppA) stomatin Thermococcus...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (1): 443–450.
Published: 29 January 2013
...David Prangishvili; Eugene V. Koonin; Mart Krupovic Archaeal viruses, especially viruses that infect hyperthermophilic archaea of the phylum Crenarchaeota, constitute one of the least understood parts of the virosphere. However, owing to recent substantial research efforts by several groups...
Includes: Supplementary data
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (1): 451–457.
Published: 29 January 2013
.... The starting point of the envisioned scenario is an ancestral archaeal lineage, probably belonging to the recently proposed ‘TACK superphylum’ [ 14 ] that is supposed to have contained the full collection of ESPs that have currently been identified in archaea, such as actin [ 16 , 27 ], tubulin [ 17...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (1): 339–343.
Published: 29 January 2013
... email soppa@bio.uni-frankfurt.de 8 11 2012 © The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 Biochemical Society 2013 Archaea gene conversion Haloarchaea polyploidy radiation resistance survival The general view distributed in textbooks and reviews is that prokaryotes...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (1): 344–349.
Published: 29 January 2013
... the sRNA populations in Archaea are considerably less well characterized. Recent analyses on a genome-wide scale particularly using high-throughput sequencing techniques demonstrated the presence of high numbers of sRNA candidates in several archaea. However, elucidation of the molecular mechanism of sRNA...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (1): 309–313.
Published: 29 January 2013
... systems of lytic viruses are evolutionarily linked or whether they have evolved independently. These and other questions will no doubt be answered as more viruses are discovered and virus replication cycles are determined, especially within viruses infecting Archaea. Molecular Biology of Archaea 3...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (1): 393–398.
Published: 29 January 2013
... and abiotic surfaces and form complex biofilm structures. Biofilm-forming archaea were identified in a broad range of extreme and moderate environments. Natural biofilms observed are mostly mixed communities composed of archaeal and bacterial species of various abundances. The physiological functions...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (1): 356–361.
Published: 29 January 2013
... shibatae RNAP) in complex with dsDNA (double-stranded DNA) constitutes a new piece of information helping the understanding of the mechanisms for DNA stabilization at the position downstream of the catalytic site during transcription. In Archaea, in contrast with Eukarya, downstream DNA stabilization...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (1): 399–404.
Published: 29 January 2013
... been identified. Although the function of RIO kinases in Archaea remains to be resolved, bioinformatics analysis (e.g. comparison of the phylogenetic distribution and gene neighbourhood analysis, as well as interaction analysis) in combination with the available phosphoproteome study of Sulfolobus...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (1): 405–410.
Published: 29 January 2013
...@bio.ku.dk ). 29 10 2012 © The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 Biochemical Society 2013 Archaea base excision repair (BER) genetic manipulation homologous recombination (HR) nucleotide excision repair (NER) Sulfolobus islandicus Organisms belonging to the genus...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (1): 326–331.
Published: 29 January 2013
... transcription machinery at promoter regions. Archaea are characterized by a simplified eukaryote-like basal transcription machinery and bacteria-type TFs, which convert sequence information into a gene expression output according to cis -regulatory rules. In the present review, we discuss the current state...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (1): 332–338.
Published: 29 January 2013
... and lagging strand synthesis (reviewed in [ 25 , 26 ]). Thus the τ-subunit can be thought of as the organizer of the replisome. The protein that couples the polymerase, helicase and primase in archaea has not yet been identified, but may be the archaeal GINS complex. This hypothesis is based in large part...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (1): 416–420.
Published: 29 January 2013
... by the newly found Nanoarchaeota and Korarchaeota. 1 email karl.stetter@biologie.uni-regensburg.de 26 10 2012 © The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 Biochemical Society 2013 Archaea Bacteria cultivation evolution phylogeny thermophile In 1980, when Wolfram Zillig...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2011) 39 (1): 116–121.
Published: 19 January 2011
...Rosalie P.C. Driessen; Remus Th. Dame Architectural proteins play an important role in compacting and organizing the chromosomal DNA in all three kingdoms of life (Eukarya, Bacteria and Archaea). These proteins are generally not conserved at the amino acid sequence level, but the mechanisms...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2011) 39 (1): 36–44.
Published: 19 January 2011
...Nicolas Soler; Marie Gaudin; Evelyne Marguet; Patrick Forterre Several families of plasmids and viruses (PVs) have now been described in hyperthermophilic archaea of the order Thermococcales. One family of plasmids replicates by the rolling circle mechanism, whereas most other PVs probably...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2011) 39 (1): 89–93.
Published: 19 January 2011
... of translation regulation mechanisms. Initiation has incurred an extensive evolutionary divergence among the primary domains of cell descent. The Archaea, albeit prokaryotes, have an initiation mechanism and apparatus more complex than those of the Bacteria; the molecular details of archaeal initiation are just...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2011) 39 (1): 155–158.
Published: 19 January 2011
...Jennifer A. Littlechild Thermophilic enzymes have advantages for their use in commercial applications and particularly for the production of chiral compounds to produce optically pure pharmaceuticals. They can be used as biocatalysts in the application of ‘green chemistry’. The thermophilic archaea...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2005) 33 (6): 1471–1473.
Published: 26 October 2005
...E.L. Bolt Overcoming DNA replication fork blocks is essential for completing genome duplication and cell division. Archaea and eukaryotes drive replication using essentially the same protein machinery. Archaea may be a valuable resource for identifying new helicase components at advancing forks...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2005) 33 (4): 780–784.
Published: 01 August 2005
... riboflavin synthase appear to have diverged early in the evolution of Archaea from a common ancestor. Interestingly, the formation of riboflavin and 5 from 8 can proceed in the absence of any catalyst under quite mild conditions. As shown in the 1960s by the research groups of Plaut and Wood...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2004) 32 (2): 303–304.
Published: 01 April 2004
...H. Ahmed; B. Tjaden; R. Hensel; B. Siebers Genome data as well as biochemical studies have indicated that – as a peculiarity within hyperthermophilic Archaea – Thermoproteus tenax uses three different pathways for glucose metabolism, a variant of the reversible EMP (Embden–Meyerhof–Parnas) pathway...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2004) 32 (2): 259–263.
Published: 01 April 2004
... so far been discovered, class I mainly found in Eucarya and class II mainly in Bacteria. Only recently were genes encoding proteins with FBPA activity identified in Archaea. Archaeal FBPAs do not share any significant overall sequence identity with members of the traditional classes of FBPAs, raising...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2004) 32 (2): 236–239.
Published: 01 April 2004
...A.I. Majerník; E.R. Jenkinson; J.P.J. Chong DNA replication enzymes in the thermophilic Archaea have previously attracted attention due to their obvious use in methods such as PCR. The proofreading ability of the Pyrococcus furiosus DNA polymerase has resulted in a commercially successful product...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2004) 32 (2): 218–221.
Published: 01 April 2004
... in determination of microbial community composition. In particular, Archaea-specific primer sequences typically lack specificity for the Korarchaeota and Nanoarchaea and are often biased towards certain clades. New primer pairs specifically designed for ‘universal’ archaeal 16 S rDNA sequence amplification...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2004) 32 (2): 199–203.
Published: 01 April 2004
..., a held at University of Exeter, 15–19 September 2003 11 December 2003 © 2004 Biochemical Society 2004 Archaea cell surface intracellular vesicle lipid outer membrane transmission electron microscopy Abbreviation used: TEM, transmission electron microscopy...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2004) 32 (2): 222–226.
Published: 01 April 2004
... University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China. 19 September 2003 © 2004 Biochemical Society 2004 Archaea gene capture horizontal gene transfer integrase integrated element pNOB8 type SSV type Abbreviations used: attB , attachment site of host chromosome; attL...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2004) 32 (2): 204–208.
Published: 01 April 2004
... Biochemical Society 2004 Archaea genome hyperthermophile virus Abbreviation used: ORF, open reading frame. 204 Biochemical Society Transactions (2004) Volume 32, part 2 Exceptionally diverse morphotypes and genomes of crenarchaeal hyperthermophilic viruses D. Prangishvili*1 and R.A...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2004) 32 (2): 273–275.
Published: 01 April 2004
... and chemical demand for oxygen is significantly increased during the bioleaching process. Sparging with enriched oxygen gas may offer an alternative process option to increased agitation and sparged aeration, to overcome the mass transfer difficulties at elevated temperatures where thermophilic Archaea, rather...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2004) 32 (2): 184–187.
Published: 01 April 2004
..., France. 19 September 2003 © 2004 Biochemical Society 2004 Archaea genetic tools plasmid Pyrococcus Thermococcales virus Abbreviations used: MGE, mobile genetic element; VLP, virus-like-particle. 184 Biochemical Society Transactions (2004) Volume 32, part 2...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2004) 32 (2): 255–258.
Published: 01 April 2004
... Biochemical Society 2004 Aeropyrum pernix Archaea dehydrogenase hyperthermophilic Sulfolobus solfataricus Abbreviations used: GAPDH, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase; ADH, alcohol dehydrogenase. Thermophiles 2003 255 Hyperthermophilic dehydrogenase enzymes J.A. Littlechild1...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2003) 31 (6): 1330–1334.
Published: 01 December 2003
..., Microbiological Production and Development, Ernst-Schering-Strasse 14, D-59179 Bergkamen, Germany. 11 June 2003 © 2003 Biochemical Society 2003 archaea phylogeny structure superoxide dismutase thermostability Abbreviations used: SOD, superoxide dismutase; SaSOD, Fe-SOD from...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2003) 31 (3): 706–710.
Published: 01 June 2003
... systems such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae . Since most archaeal species are extremophilic and difficult to cultivate, current knowledge of recombination in the Archaea is confined largely to comparative genomics and biochemistry. A clear view of what we can learn will not emerge until...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2003) 31 (3): 690–693.
Published: 01 June 2003
...M.F. White It is now generally accepted that the Archaea share many similarities in their information-processing pathways with eukarya. Archaeal and eukaryal DNA replication and transcriptional machineries show particularly striking similarities, and the archaeal processes have been used...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2003) 31 (3): 694–698.
Published: 01 June 2003
...S. McCready; L. Marcello Halobacterium is one of the few known Archaea that tolerates high levels of sunlight in its natural environment. Photoreactivation is probably its most important strategy for surviving UV irradiation and we have shown that both of the major UV photoproducts, cyclobutane...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2003) 31 (3): 674–676.
Published: 01 June 2003
...I. Dionne; N.P. Robinson; A.T. McGeoch; V.L. Marsh; A. Reddish; S.D. Bell Studies of the DNA-replication machinery of Archaea have revealed striking similarities to that of eukaryotes. Indeed, it appears that in most cases Archaea possess a simplified version of the eukaryotic replication apparatus...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2003) 31 (3): 699–702.
Published: 01 June 2003
... to efficiently eliminate uracil from archaeal genomes. 1 To whom correspondence should be addressed (e-mail b.a.connolly@ncl.ac.uk ). Molecular Mechanisms and Manipulation in Archaea, a Biochemical Society-sponsored meeting held at The University of Nottingham, 30–31 January 2003 25 January...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2003) 31 (3): 686–689.
Published: 01 June 2003
...G.W. Hutcheon; A. Bolhuis The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway is a system with the unique ability to export proteins in a fully folded conformation. Its main components are TatA, TatB and TatC, all of which are required for Tat-dependent export. The Tat pathway is found in several Archaea...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2003) 31 (3): 703–705.
Published: 01 June 2003
... remote from replication origins. These functions are crucial to ensuring that genomes are transmitted successfully into subsequent generations of cells. Enzymes of HR have been unearthed in all three domains of life: bacteria, Archaea and eukarya. Helicases that specifically unwind branched DNA molecules...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2002) 30 (4): 710–712.
Published: 01 August 2002
... differed considerably from iron-repleted ones. Furthermore, both types of membrane exhibited different degrees of inhibition by cyanide. 1 To whom correspondence should be addressed (e-mail anemueller@biochem.mu-luebeck.de ) 7 3 2002 © 2002 Biochemical Society 2002 Archaea...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2002) 30 (4): 713–715.
Published: 01 August 2002
... ferritin although it shares only little sequence homology with non-haem bacterial ferritin. 1 To whom correspondence should be addressed (e-mail matzanke@physik.mu-luebeck.de ) 7 3 2002 © 2002 Biochemical Society 2002 Archaea molecular modelling Dps, starvation-induced...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2002) 30 (4): 685–687.
Published: 01 August 2002
... Biochemical Society 2002 Archaea heterologous expression iron-sulphur cluster thermophilic aconitase IRP, iron regulatory protein c-type, cytoplasmic type Biometals 2002: Third International Biometals Symposium: Focused Meeting Organized by S. Andrews (School of Animal and Microbial...