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Keyword: yeast
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Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2018) 46 (6): 1551-1558.
Published: 31 October 2018
...Kamilla M. E. Laidlaw; Chris MacDonald Various membrane trafficking pathways transport molecules through the endosomal system of eukaryotic cells, where trafficking decisions control the localisation and activity of a diverse repertoire of membrane protein cargoes. The budding yeast Saccharomyces...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2016) 44 (2): 474-478.
Published: 11 April 2016
... to the plasma membrane (PM) directly, along a route that bypasses retrograde movement to the Golgi. Despite recognition of this pathway for decades we are only beginning to understand the machinery controlling this overall process. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae , a stalwart genetic...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2015) 43 (6): 1266-1270.
Published: 27 November 2015
...Estelle Dacheux; Helena Firczuk; Helena Firczuk; John E.G. McCarthy Yeast commits approximately 76% of its energy budget to protein synthesis and the efficiency and control of this process are accordingly critical to organism growth and fitness. We now have detailed genetic, biochemical and...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2014) 42 (6): 1715-1719.
Published: 17 November 2014
...Carlos Gancedo; Carmen-Lisset Flores; Juana M. Gancedo The present article addresses the possibilities offered by yeasts to study the problem of the evolution of moonlighting proteins. It focuses on data available on hexokinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that moonlights in catabolite repression...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2012) 40 (4): 794-799.
Published: 20 July 2012
... review, we summarize the impact of stress on translation initiation, highlighting both the similarities and distinctions between various stress responses. Finally, we speculate as to how yeast cells generate stress-responsive programmes of protein production when regulation is focused on the same steps...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2011) 39 (5): 1514-1519.
Published: 21 September 2011
... explanations why mitophagy in yeast, in contrast with the situation in mammals, was found to be independent of mitochondrial fission. We further discuss recent findings linking these processes to nutrient sensing pathways and the general stress response in yeast. In particular, we propose a model for how the...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2011) 39 (5): 1461-1465.
Published: 21 September 2011
... (non-stop decay, when mRNAs lack a termination codon, and NGD (no-go decay), when mRNA translation elongation stalls. Many proteins involved in these processes are conserved from bacteria to yeast and humans. Recent papers showed the involvement of proteins deputed to decapping in controlling cell...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2011) 39 (3): 719-723.
Published: 20 May 2011
... the pure protein in quantities much higher than those found in the protein's native source. Yeast is a popular host as it is a eukaryote with similar synthetic machinery to that of the native human source cells of many proteins of interest, while also being quick, easy and cheap to grow and process...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2011) 39 (2): 437-442.
Published: 22 March 2011
... with yeast have contributed greatly to our understanding of the molecular pathways in which TORs operate. Recently, building on advances in quantitative MS, the rapamycin-dependent phosphoproteome in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was elucidated. These studies emphasize the central...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2010) 38 (5): 1189-1196.
Published: 24 September 2010
... © The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 Biochemical Society 2010 complexity control analysis regulation analysis systems biology yeast Although it has become possible to characterize almost all its molecular components, no comprehensive function of any living organism has yet been...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2010) 38 (4): 1093-1098.
Published: 26 July 2010
... exosome La nuclease RNA processing signal recognition particle (SRP) yeast Non-coding RNAs have a long (and ever-increasing) list of functions in cells. However, few, if any, of these RNAs act alone; instead, they are assembled into multi-component machines, RNPs (ribonucleoproteins). Many...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2010) 38 (4): 875-878.
Published: 26 July 2010
... 2010 © The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 Biochemical Society 2010 high-throughput method interactome metabolon tandem affinity purification tag (TAP-tag) two-hybrid screen yeast Traditionally, protein–protein interactions have been identified and characterized using low...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2010) 38 (1): 273-277.
Published: 19 January 2010
...Jindriska Fiserova; Martin W. Goldberg Eukaryotic cells have developed a series of highly controlled processes of transport between the nucleus and cytoplasm. The present review focuses on the latest advances in our understanding of nucleocytoplasmic exchange of molecules in yeast, a widely studied...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2009) 37 (1): 273-277.
Published: 20 January 2009
... control of mitotic onset and cell division. In the present paper, I discuss the interplay between two major signalling pathways, the TOR and the stress MAPK signalling pathways, in controlling mitotic commitment, with the main focus being on fission yeast ( Schizosaccharomyces pombe ). 1 email...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2008) 36 (5): 791-796.
Published: 19 September 2008
...Naima Belgareh-Touzé; Sébastien Léon; Zoi Erpapazoglou; Marta Stawiecka-Mirota; Danièle Urban-Grimal; Rosine Haguenauer-Tsapis The ubiquitin ligase (E3) Rsp5p is the only member of the Nedd (neural-precursor-cell-expressed, developmentally down-regulated) 4 family of E3s present in yeast. Rsp5p has...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2008) 36 (5): 1083-1087.
Published: 19 September 2008
... they act as novel epigenetic regulators of phenotype. Even though most of the human prion diseases arise spontaneously, we still know remarkably little about how infectious prions form de novo . The [ PSI + ] prion of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides a highly tractable model in which to...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2008) 36 (5): 1088-1090.
Published: 19 September 2008
...Sandra V. Vergara; Dennis J. Thiele Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) is an excellent model for understanding fundamental biological mechanisms that are conserved in Nature and that have an impact on human disease. The metal iron is a redox-active cofactor that plays critical biochemical...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2008) 36 (5): 1091-1096.
Published: 19 September 2008
...-nc/2.5/ ) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. ChIP-Seq high-throughput sequencing massively parallel sequencing microarray RNA-Seq transcriptome yeast Just when the era of...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2008) 36 (5): 1097-1101.
Published: 19 September 2008
... kinase Wee1. Four protein kinases contribute to this amplification loop: MPF itself, Polo kinase, MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and Greatwall kinase. The fission yeast SPB (spindle pole body) component Cut12 plays a critical role in modulating mitotic commitment. In this review, I discuss the...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2008) 36 (4): 712-716.
Published: 22 July 2008
... ‘recoding’. ‘CHYSEL’ peptides are ∼19-amino-acid sequences found in many viral genomes. When translated at internal portions of polypeptides, they yield co-translational separation of the nascent chain at their C-termini. We dissected the reaction promoted by CHYSEL sequences using yeast genetics and in...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2008) 36 (3): 479-482.
Published: 21 May 2008
.... The interaction brings the fragments together, which then fold, reassemble and fluoresce. This process can be carried out in living cells and provides information both on the interaction and its subcellular location. We have developed a split-GFP-based BiFC assay for use in the budding yeast...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2007) 35 (6): 1385-1388.
Published: 23 November 2007
...H.D. Ulrich Attachment of the SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) to the replication factor PCNA (proliferating-cell nuclear antigen) in the budding yeast has been shown to recruit a helicase, Srs2, to active replication forks, which in turn prevents unscheduled recombination events. In the...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2007) 35 (6): 1525-1528.
Published: 23 November 2007
... incorrectly paired bases are removed, are conserved from prokaryotes to human. Thus yeast can serve as a model organism for analysing mutations/polymorphisms found in human mismatch repair genes for their effect on post-replicative repair. To date, this has predominantly been accomplished by making the...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2007) 35 (6): 1588-1592.
Published: 23 November 2007
... important goal of ongoing process optimization. We have examined DAO from the yeast Trigonopsis variabilis with the aim of developing a rational basis for the stabilization of the enzyme activity at elevated temperature and under conditions of substrate turnover. Loss of activity in the resting enzyme can...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2007) 35 (2): 239-241.
Published: 20 March 2007
...Y. Yan; J.M. Backer The class III PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase), Vps34 (vacuolar protein sorting 34), was first identified as a regulator of vacuolar hydrolase sorting in yeast. Unlike other PI3Ks, the Vps34 lipid kinase specifically utilizes phosphatidylinositol as a substrate, producing the...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2006) 34 (5): 837-841.
Published: 25 October 2006
... bardwell@uci.edu 27 6 2006 © 2006 The Biochemical Society 2006 docking site mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) scaffold protein Ste7 yeast Specificity in cellular signal transduction is achieved by multiple mechanisms. First and foremost, as in all other cellular...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2006) 34 (5): 786-790.
Published: 25 October 2006
... synthesis and salvage pathways that interconvert the purine nucleotides. This review describes the mechanism for regulation of the biosynthetic genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and compares this mechanism with that described in several microbial species. 1 email rolfesr@georgetown.edu...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2006) 34 (6): 1058-1061.
Published: 25 October 2006
...) domain X-ray crystallography yeast RNA synthesis in the eukaryote nucleus is carried out by the multisubunit RNA polymerases (Pols) I, II and III. Whereas Pol I and Pol II synthesize ribosomal and mainly mRNA respectively, Pol III transcribes small RNAs, including transfer RNAs, 5 S ribosomal RNA...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2006) 34 (4): 550-553.
Published: 21 July 2006
... telomeres to the nuclear envelope and undergo oscillating movements that become restricted to a limited nuclear sector during the widely conserved bouquet stage. Recent observations in budding yeast meiosis suggest that telomere clustering depends on actin, whereas exit from the bouquet stage requires...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2006) 34 (3): 346-350.
Published: 22 May 2006
...C.J. Mousley; K.R. Tyeryar; M.M. Ryan; V.A. Bankaitis The major PI (phosphatidylinositol)/PC (phosphatidylcholine)-transfer protein in yeast, Sec14p, co-ordinates lipid metabolism with protein transport from the Golgi complex. Yeast also express five additional gene products that share 24–65...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2006) 34 (3): 404-408.
Published: 22 May 2006
... transport. 1 To whom correspondence should be addressed (email voelkerd@njc.org ). 6 12 2005 © 2006 The Biochemical Society 2006 endoplasmic reticulum mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) macromolecular assembly phosphatidylserine traffic ubiquitination yeast With...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2006) 34 (3): 340-342.
Published: 22 May 2006
... reticulum). NV junctions mediate a unique autophagic process that degrades portions of the yeast nucleus through a process called ‘piecemeal microautophagy of the nucleus’ (PMN). Our studies suggest that the lipid composition of NV junctions plays an important role in the biogenesis of PMN structures. NV...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2006) 34 (3): 367-369.
Published: 22 May 2006
... © 2006 The Biochemical Society 2006 ceramide synthase endoplasmic reticulum inositolphosphorylceramide serine palmitoyltransferase sphingolipid biosynthesis yeast Sphingolipids are important components of membranes, in particular the plasma membrane, where they are thought to play...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2006) 34 (3): 377-380.
Published: 22 May 2006
...P. Griac; R. Holic; D. Tahotna Yeast Sec14p acts as a phosphatidylinositol/phosphatidylcholine-transfer protein in vitro . In vivo , it is essential in promoting Golgi secretory function. Products of five genes named SFH1 – SFH5 ( S ec F ourteen H omologues 1–5) exhibit significant sequence...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2006) 34 (3): 356-358.
Published: 22 May 2006
...D.P. Sullivan; H. Ohvo-Rekilä; N.A. Baumann; C.T. Beh; A.K. Menon We recently showed that transport of ergosterol from the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) to the sterol-enriched PM (plasma membrane) in yeast occurs by a non-vesicular (Sec18p-independent) mechanism that results in the equilibration of...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2006) 34 (1): 39-42.
Published: 20 January 2006
... factors to stimulate mRNA decapping. 1 To whom correspondence should be addressed (email allan.jacobson@umassmed.edu ). 20 6 2005 © 2006 The Biochemical Society 2006 faux untranslated region mRNA decay translation termination yeast Gene expression is a highly...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2005) 33 (6): 1247-1249.
Published: 26 October 2005
... SH3-containing proteins in actin cytoskeleton regulation. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome includes 29 SH3 domains distributed in 25 proteins. We have examined the direct involvement of these SH3 domains in actin polymerization using an in vitro polymerization assay on GST (glutathione S...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2005) 33 (5): 1206-1209.
Published: 26 October 2005
... of their antifungal activity. 1 To whom correspondence should be addressed (email Ivan.Hapala@savba.sk ). 1 6 2005 © 2005 The Biochemical Society 2005 amphotericin B antifungal activity mutagenesis nystatin sterol yeast After more than 40 years of use in...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2005) 33 (5): 1150-1153.
Published: 26 October 2005
...G.M. Carman The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has the ability to cope with a variety of stress conditions (e.g. zinc deficiency) by regulating the expression of enzyme activities including those involved with phospholipid synthesis. Zinc is an essential mineral required for the growth and...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2005) 33 (5): 1186-1188.
Published: 26 October 2005
... the absence of oxygen, as the synthesis of these lipids requires molecular oxygen. The fact that yeast grows well under anaerobic conditions indicates that lipid uptake is rapid and efficient. To identify components in this lipid uptake and transport pathway, we screened the yeast mutant collection...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2005) 33 (5): 1162-1165.
Published: 26 October 2005
... . The recent characterization of three missing enzymes completes the pathway. Etr1p (enoyl thioester reductase) was identified via purification of the protein followed by molecular cloning. To study the link between FAS and cell respiration further, we also created a yeast strain that has FabI enoyl-ACP...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2005) 33 (5): 1166-1169.
Published: 26 October 2005
...L.A. Cowart; Y.A. Hannun In addition to their crucial role in membrane structure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae , sphingolipids serve vital roles in various aspects of yeast biology including endocytosis, intracellular protein transport and stress responses. Although previous studies have...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2005) 33 (5): 1197-1201.
Published: 26 October 2005
...C. Ruckenstuhl; A. Eidenberger; S. Lang; F. Turnowsky Squalene epoxidase (Erg1p) is an essential enzyme in the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway in yeast. For its enzymatic activity, Erg1p requires molecular oxygen, NAD(P)H and FAD. Amino acid analysis and sequence alignment with other squalene...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2005) 33 (5): 1141-1145.
Published: 26 October 2005
... voelkerd@njc.org 2 6 2005 © 2005 The Biochemical Society 2005 C2 domain lipid phosphatidylserine phospholipid transport yeast PtdSer (phosphatidylserine), PtdEtn (phosphatidylethanolamine) and PtdCho (phosphatidylcholine) comprise a subgroup of polar lipids known as the...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2005) 33 (5): 1174-1177.
Published: 26 October 2005
...A. Wagner; G. Daum Since energy storage is a basic metabolic process, the synthesis of neutral lipids occurs in all kingdoms of life. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae , widely accepted as a model eukaryotic cell, contains two classes of neutral lipids, namely STEs (steryl esters) and TAGs...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2005) 33 (5): 1146-1149.
Published: 26 October 2005
...H.A. Boumann; A.I.P.M. de Kroon Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is a very abundant membrane lipid in most eukaryotes, including yeast. The molecular species profile of PC, i.e. the ensemble of PC molecules with acyl chains differing in number of carbon atoms and double bonds, is important for membrane...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2005) 33 (1): 294-296.
Published: 01 February 2005
...M. Vanoni; R.L. Rossi; L. Querin; V. Zinzalla; L. Alberghina Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells grown in glucose have larger average size than cells grown in ethanol. Besides, yeast must reach a carbon source-modulated critical cell size in order to enter S phase at Start. This control is of outmost...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2004) 32 (5): 707-711.
Published: 26 October 2004
...M.A. Lemmon PH domains (pleckstrin homology domains) are the 11th most common domain in the human genome and are best known for their ability to target cellular membranes by binding specifically to phosphoinositides. Recent studies in yeast have shown that, in fact, this is a property of only a...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2003) 31 (6): 1409-1412.
Published: 01 December 2003
... activity of glyoxalase I and the GSH concentration. Moreover, our model predicts an intracellular steady-state concentration of methylglyoxal of approx. 2 μM. Our results show that the glyoxalase pathway is the main detoxification pathway for 2-oxoaldehydes in yeast, and is likely to be the key enzymatic...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2003) 31 (1): 11-15.
Published: 01 February 2003
... being assigned to a plethora of phosphorylated derivatives of inositol and phosphatidylinositol. Two such examples are discussed briefly: the activation by environmental stresses of the single phosphoinositidase C of yeast, which is related to the phospholipase C δs of other eukaryotes, and the...