To investigate the effects of miR-9 on high glucose (HG)-induced cardiac fibrosis in human cardiac fibroblasts (HCFs), and to establish the mechanism underlying these effects. HCFs were transfected with miR-9 inhibitor or mimic, and then treated with normal or HG. Cell viability and proliferation were detected by using the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and Brdu-ELISA assay. Cell differentiation and collagen accumulation of HCFs were detected by qRT-PCR and Western blot assays respectively. The mRNA and protein expressions of transforming growth factor-β receptor type II (TGFBR2) were determined by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Up-regulation of miR-9 dramatically improved HG-induced increases in cell proliferation, differentiation and collagen accumulation of HCFs. Moreover, bioinformatics analysis predicted that the TGFBR2 was a potential target gene of miR-9. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR-9 could directly target TGFBR2. Inhibition of TGFBR2 had the similar effect as miR-9 overexpression. Down-regulation of TGFBR2 in HCFs transfected with miR-9 inhibitor partially reversed the protective effect of miR-9 overexpression on HG-induced cardiac fibrosis in HCFs. Up-regulation of miR-9 ameliorates HG-induced proliferation, differentiation and collagen accumulation of HCFs by down-regulation of TGFBR2. These results provide further evidence for protective effect of miR-9 overexpression on HG-induced cardiac fibrosis.

INTRODUCTION

Long-term diabetes can lead to the development of cardiovascular complications such as cardiac fibrosis [1,2]. One of the major pathophysiological processes is cardiac fibrosis that contributes to increasing myocardial stiffness and reducing pumping capacity, ultimately resulting in heart failure [3,4]. However, as far as I know, there is no curative treatment for cardiac fibrosis. Cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) that account for 20% of the myocardial mass have been identified as the important mediators of physiological and pathological cardiac remodelling. The stimuli such as transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) or angiotensin II can induce CFs proliferation, migration, myofibroblast differentiation, matrix generation and degradation, secretion of cytokines. The main characters of cardiac fibrosis are enhanced proliferation and myofibroblast differentiation of CFs, and collagen (such as collagen I and collagen III) accumulation [5]. Many reports have showed that high glucose (HG) or hyperglycaemia, the main feature of diabetes mellitus, can promote proliferation, myofibroblast differentiation and induced collagen synthesis of CFs in vitro [68], leading to the pathological changes in the cardiovascular system. However, the precise mechanisms underlying HG-induced cardiac fibrosis are still unclear.

miRNAs are a type of endogenous small (approximately 22 nucleotides in length) and non-coding RNAs that regulate specific gene expression by binding to complementary sequences in the 3′-UTR of targeted messenger RNA (mRNA) [9,10]. The functions of miRNAs have been reported to degrade mRNA or suppress mRNA translation, leading to regulating a series of cell functions such as proliferation, invasion, apoptosis and differentiation [11,12]. More and more reports indicated that miRNAs are involved in regulating cardiac fibrosis [1315]. These miRNAs have been reported to play a critical role in regulating the progression of cardiac fibrosis. Up-regulation of miR-34a [16], miR-19b [17], miR-503 [18] or miR-125b [19] can induce cardiac fibrosis, whereas overexpression of miR-101a [20], miR-17-3p or miR-29a [21] inhibits the fibrosis of CFs. Wang et al. [22] had reported that forced overexpression of miR-9 inhibited proliferation and collagen production of CFs by down-regulation of PDGFR. This result means that the importance of miR-9 in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis. However, the precise mechanism and role of miR-9 in HG-induced cardiac fibrosis remain unknown.

In the present paper, up-regulation of miR-9 had the protective effect on HG-induced proliferation, differentiation and collagen accumulation of human cardiac fibroblasts (HCFs). Moreover, we found that transforming growth factor-β receptor type II (TGFBR2) was the direct target of miR-9 in HCFs. Up-regulation of TGFBR2 had the similar effect as down-regulation of miR-9. Down-regulation of TGFBR2 in HCFs partially reversed the protective effect of miR-9 overexpression on HG-induced cardiac fibrosis in HCFs. Therefore, our outcomes showed critical roles for miR-9 in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiac fibrosis and suggested its possible application in treatment for HG-induced cardiac fibrosis.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Cell culture and transient transfection

HCFs were purchased from ScienCell (#6300), and cultured in Fibroblast Medium-2 (#2331) containing 5% FBS (#0025), 1% penicillin/streptomycin (#0503) and 1% fibroblast growth supplement-2 (#2382) at 37°C in 5% CO2 on 0.1% gelatin-coated culture flasks. Passage 3–5 HCFs were used for experiments.

The miR-9 inhibitor, the miR-9 mimic, miR-negative control of inhibitor (anti-miR-NC), miR-negative control of mimic (miR-NC), siRNA for TGFBR2 (si-TGFBR2), siRNA-negative control (si-NC), pcDNA3.1-TGFBR2 and pcDNA3.1 vector were synthesized and purified by RiboBio. miR-9 inhibitor (100 nM), mimic (50 nM), anti-miR-NC (100 nM), miR-NC (50 nM), si-NC (100 nM) and si-TGFBR2 (100 nM) were transfected into HCFs by using Lipofectamine 3000 reagent (Invitrogen) according to the manufacturer's protocols.

Construction of plasmids

The 3′-UTR sequences of TGFBR2 gene, containing the putative miR-9 binding site, was amplified by PCR and cloned into the pGL3-control vector (Promega), which was named wild-type 3′-UTR (WT 3′-UTR). Point mutations in the putative miR-9 binding seed regions were carried out using the Quick-ChangeSite-Directed Mutagenesis kit (SBS Genetech) following the manufacturer's instruction. The resultant product served as the mutated 3′-UTR (MUT 3′-UTR). Both the wild-type and mutantinsert fragments sequences were confirmed by DNA sequencing.

RNA extraction and reverse transcription PCR

Total RNA of HCFs was extracted by Trizol reagent (Invitrogen) for analysing miRNA and mRNA levels according to the manufacturer's protocols. For quantification of miR-9, the TaqMan MicroRNA Reverse Transcription Kit and TaqMan miRNA assay (Applied Biosystems) were used to perform reverse transcription and PCR according to the manufacturer's instructions. U6 was used as the internal control. The gene expressions of TGFBR2, α-SMA, collagen I, III and VI were detected by using the SYBR Green PCR kits (Qiagen). glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) served as an internal control. The following primers were used: TGFBR2 forward, 5′-GTAGCTCTGATGAGTGCAATGAC-3′, reverse, 5′-CAGATATGGCAACTCCCAGTG-3′; α-SMA forward, 5′-CTA-TGAGGGCTATGCCTTGCC-3′, reverse, 5′-GCTCAGCAGTA-GTAACGAAGGA-3′; collagen I forward, 5′-ACGCATGAGCC-GAAGCTAAC-3′, reverse, 5′-AGGGACCCTTAGGCCATTGT-3′; collagen III forward, 5′-ATAGACCTCAAGGCCCCAAG-3′, reverse, 5′-CCACCCATTCCTCCGACT-3′; Collagen VI forw-ard, 5′-ACAGTGACGAGGTGGAGATCA-3′, reverse, 5′-GA-TAGCGCAGTCGGTGTAGG3′; GAPDH forward, 5′-ACAA-CTTTGGTATCGTGGAAGG-3′, reverse, 5′-GCCATCACGCC-ACAGTTTC-3′.

Cell viability assay

Cell Counting Kit-8 assay (CCK-8, Sigma) was used to detect the viability of HCFs. HCFs (1×104 cells/well) were seeded in 96-well plates overnight. After that, cells were transfected with miR-9 inhibitor or mimic for 24 h. Then, cells were treated with HG for 24 h, and then incubated with WST-8 substrate at 37°C for 2 h. Absorbance (450 nm) of the medium was detected using a spectrophotometer by assessing the cell viability.

Cell proliferation assay

ELISA-BrdU assay was performed to examine the effect of miR-9 on cell proliferation of HCFs. Then, cells were seeded in 96-well plate at 5×103 cells/well. After 24 h, we removed the medium and transfected cells with miR-9 mimic or inhibitor at 37°C for 24 h. cell proliferation was detected by using Cell Proliferation ELISA-BrdU Kit (Millipore) following the manufacturer's protocols.

Western blot analysis

HCFs were lysed using protein lysis buffer with protease inhibitor cocktail. The protein concentration of cell lysates was quantified by BCA Kit, and 50 ng of protein were separated by 10% SDS/PAGE and then transferred on to a PVDF membrane (Millipore). The membranes were blocked in 5% non-fat dry milk diluted with TBST at RT for 1 h and probed overnight at 4°C with primary antibody, as follow: anti-TGFBR2 antibody (ab186838), anti-α-SMA (α-smooth muscle actin) antibody (ab21027) (Abcam). After that, the membranes were wash by TBST and incubated with a goat anti-rabbit or anti-mouse IgG conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (Abcam) for 1 h at RT. Incubation with monoclonal mouse α-tubulin antibody (1:1000 dilution; Sigma) was performed as the loading control. The proteins were visualized using ECL western blotting detection reagents (Millipore). The densitometry of the bands was quantified using the ImageJ 1.38X software.

Dual-luciferase reporter assay

HCFs were seeded in 6-well plates (2×105/well) and incubated overnight before transfection. Then, pGL3-TGFBR2-3′-UTR wild-type or mutant reporter plasmid, miR-9 inhibitor and anti-miR-NC, or miR-9 mimic and miR-NC, and pRL-TK Renilla luciferase reporter (Promega) were cotransfected into cells by using Lipofectamine 2000 (Invitrogen). After that, luciferase activities were quantified using the Dual-Luciferase reporter system (Promega) following the manufacturer's protocols. And firefly luciferase activities were normalized to Renilla luciferase activities.

Statistical analysis

Experiments were repeated at least three times. Values are expressed as mean ± S.E.M. Data were evaluated for statistical significance by analysis using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). P<0.05 was considered to indicate a statistically significant difference. All statistical analyses were performed using GraphPad Prism 5.0 (GraphPad Software).

RESULTS

Effect of miR-9 on HG-induced proliferation of HCFs

To investigate the effect of miR-9 on HG-induced cell proliferation of HCFs, HCFs were transfected with miR-9 mimic at 0, 25, 50 or 100 nM for 24 h before stimulation with 5.5 or 25 mM glucose for 24 h, after which cell viability and proliferation were detected. According to previous reports in which the effects of HG in diabetic cardiomyopathy were studied, osmotic control had no significant effects on the cells, So osmotic control was not considered in our study [23,24]. Compared with untreated controls, HG significantly increased cell viability and promoted cell proliferation, whereas miR-9 up-regulation significantly decreased cell viability and inhibited proliferation of HG-treated HCFs (Figures 1A and 1B). Next, cell viability and proliferation were also measured in HG-stimulated HCFs after transfection with 0, 25, 50 or 100 nM miR-9 inhibitor for 24 h. As shown in Figures 1(C) and 1(D), down-regulation of miR-9 evidently enhanced HG-induced cell viability and proliferation of HCFs. We then detected the level of miR-9 in HG-induced HCFs. The outcomes showed that HG could dramatically decrease the level of miR-9 in a time-dependent manner (Figure 1E).

Effects of miR-9 on HG-induced cell viability and proliferation in HCFs

Figure 1
Effects of miR-9 on HG-induced cell viability and proliferation in HCFs

HCFs were transfected with miR-9 inhibitor or mimic, and then treated with 5.5 or 25 mM glucose for 24 h. (A and C) Cell viability of HCFs was detected by CCK-8 assay. (B and D) Cell proliferation of HCFs was determined by Brdu-ELISA assay. (E) The level of miR-9 was determined by qRT-PCR. The data shown are mean ± S.E.M. (n=4). *P<0.05, **P<0.01, ***P<0.001 compared with control; #P<0.05, ##P<0.01, ###P<0.001 compared with vehicle + HG.

Figure 1
Effects of miR-9 on HG-induced cell viability and proliferation in HCFs

HCFs were transfected with miR-9 inhibitor or mimic, and then treated with 5.5 or 25 mM glucose for 24 h. (A and C) Cell viability of HCFs was detected by CCK-8 assay. (B and D) Cell proliferation of HCFs was determined by Brdu-ELISA assay. (E) The level of miR-9 was determined by qRT-PCR. The data shown are mean ± S.E.M. (n=4). *P<0.05, **P<0.01, ***P<0.001 compared with control; #P<0.05, ##P<0.01, ###P<0.001 compared with vehicle + HG.

Effect of miR-9 on HG-induced myofibroblasts differentiation of HCFs

To investigate the function of miR-9 in the differentiation of HCFs into myofibroblasts in vitro, we treated HCFs with HG for 24 h after transfection with miR-9 mimic or inhibitor. The mRNA and protein levels of α-SMA, a myofibroblast marker, in HCFs were significantly increased by HG stimulation as compared with control group (Figure 2). Up-regulation of miR-9 evidently inhibited the increase in HG-induced α-SMA expression at mRNA and protein levels (Figure 2A). On the contrary, miR-9 down-regulation could promote HG-stimulated expressions of α-SMA (Figure 2B). These findings indicated that miR-9 overexpression protected HCFs from HG-induced differentiation.

Effects of miR-9 on HG-induced differentiation in HCFs

Figure 2
Effects of miR-9 on HG-induced differentiation in HCFs

HCFs were transfected with miR-9 inhibitor or mimic, and then treated with 5.5 or 25 mM glucose for 24 h. (A and B) The mRNA and protein levels of α-SMA were determined by qRT-PCR and Western blot respectively. The data shown are mean ± S.E.M. (n=4). **P<0.01, ***P<0.001 compared with control; ##P<0.01, ###P<0.001 compared with vehicle + HG.

Figure 2
Effects of miR-9 on HG-induced differentiation in HCFs

HCFs were transfected with miR-9 inhibitor or mimic, and then treated with 5.5 or 25 mM glucose for 24 h. (A and B) The mRNA and protein levels of α-SMA were determined by qRT-PCR and Western blot respectively. The data shown are mean ± S.E.M. (n=4). **P<0.01, ***P<0.001 compared with control; ##P<0.01, ###P<0.001 compared with vehicle + HG.

Effect of miR-9 on HG-induced collagen synthesis of HCFs

To demonstrate the effect of miR-9 in collagen synthesis, HCFs transfected with miR-9 mimic were exposed to HG for 24 h, and mRNA levels of collagen I, III and VI were analysed by qRT-PCR analysis. As expected, mRNA levels of collagen I, III and VI were significantly decreased in HCFs transfected with miR-9 mimic when compared with HG-treated HCFs (Figure 3A). However, miR-9 inhibitor specifically increased HG-induced collagen synthesis (Figure 3B), further confirming the effect of miR-9 in collagen synthesis.

Effects of miR-9 on HG-induced collagen deposition in HCFs

Figure 3
Effects of miR-9 on HG-induced collagen deposition in HCFs

HCFs were transfected with miR-9 inhibitor or mimic, and then treated with 5.5 or 25 mM glucose for 24 h. The mRNA levels of collagen I, III and VI were determined by qRT-PCR. The data shown are mean ± S.E.M. (n=4). **P<0.01 compared with control; #P<0.05, ##P<0.01 compared with vehicle + HG.

Figure 3
Effects of miR-9 on HG-induced collagen deposition in HCFs

HCFs were transfected with miR-9 inhibitor or mimic, and then treated with 5.5 or 25 mM glucose for 24 h. The mRNA levels of collagen I, III and VI were determined by qRT-PCR. The data shown are mean ± S.E.M. (n=4). **P<0.01 compared with control; #P<0.05, ##P<0.01 compared with vehicle + HG.

MiR-9 can directly target TGFBR2 in HCFs

The online database (TargetScan 6.2) predicted that TGFBR2 was a binding target of miR-9, we performed qRT-PCR to detect the expression of TGFBR2 on mRNA level in HG-induced HCFs transfected with miR-9 inhibitor or mimic. We found that mRNA level of TGFBR2 was remarkably decreased after up-regulation of miR-9 (Figure 4A), but was evidently increased after down-regulation of miR-9 compared with HG-treated HCFs (Figure 4A). To further demonstrate whether TGFBR2 was a direct target of miR-9, TGFBR2 3′-UTR was cloned into a luciferase reporter vector and the putative miR-9 binding site in the TGFBR2 3′-UTR was mutated (Figure 4B). The effect of miR-9 was determined using luciferase reporter assay. Our results indicated that up-regulation or down-regulation of miR-9 significantly inhibited or promoted the luciferase activity of pGL3-TGFBR2 3′-UTR WT (Figure 4C). Mutation of the miR-9-binding site in the TGFBR2 3′-UTR abolished the effect of miR-9, which suggested that TGFBR2 was directly and negatively regulated by miR-9.

TGFBR2 was a direct target of miR-9

Figure 4
TGFBR2 was a direct target of miR-9

HCFs were transfected with miR-9 inhibitor or mimic, and then treated with 5.5 or 25 mM glucose for 24 h. (A) The mRNA level of TGFBR2 was determined by qRT-PCR in HCFs. TGFBR2 expression was normalized to GAPDH. (B) Schematic representation of TGFBR2 3′-UTRs showing putative miRNA target site. (C) The analysis of the relative luciferase activities of TGFBR2-WT, TGFBR2-MUT in HCFs. All data are presented as mean ± S.E.M. (n=4). **P<0.01 compared with control; #P<0.05, ##P<0.01 compared with vehicle + HG or anti-miR-NC or miR-NC.

Figure 4
TGFBR2 was a direct target of miR-9

HCFs were transfected with miR-9 inhibitor or mimic, and then treated with 5.5 or 25 mM glucose for 24 h. (A) The mRNA level of TGFBR2 was determined by qRT-PCR in HCFs. TGFBR2 expression was normalized to GAPDH. (B) Schematic representation of TGFBR2 3′-UTRs showing putative miRNA target site. (C) The analysis of the relative luciferase activities of TGFBR2-WT, TGFBR2-MUT in HCFs. All data are presented as mean ± S.E.M. (n=4). **P<0.01 compared with control; #P<0.05, ##P<0.01 compared with vehicle + HG or anti-miR-NC or miR-NC.

Down-regulation of TGFBR2 had similar effects with miR-9 overexpression

To explore the function of TGFBR2, HCFs were transfected with si-TGFBR2. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of TGFBR2 at protein level was significantly decreased after 24 h in HCFs transfected with si-TGFBR2 (Figure 5A). The Brdu-ELISA assay revealed that down-regulation of TGFBR2 evidently decreased HG-induced proliferation of HCFs (Figure 5B). Furthermore, TGFBR2 down-regulation dramatically decreased differentiation and collagen production of HCFs compared with HG-only groups (Figures 5C and 5D). These results indicated that overexpression of miR-9 down-regulated the expression of TGFBR2, thus protecting HCFs from HG-induced cardiac fibrosis.

The effects of TGFBR2 knockdown on HG-induced cell proliferation, differentiation and collagen accumulation in HCFs

Figure 5
The effects of TGFBR2 knockdown on HG-induced cell proliferation, differentiation and collagen accumulation in HCFs

HCFs were transfected with si-TGFBR2 or si-NC, and then treated with 5.5 or 25 mM glucose for 24 h. (A) The protein expression of TGFBR2 was determined by Western blot. α-Tubulin was detected as a loading control. (B) Cell proliferation was assessed by Brdu-ELISA assay. (C) The mRNA level of α-SMA was determined by qRT-PCR. (D) The mRNA levels of collagen I, III and VI were determined by qRT-PCR. All data are presented as mean ± S.E.M. (n=4). **P<0.01, #P<0.05, ##P<0.01 compared with control or HG + si-NC.

Figure 5
The effects of TGFBR2 knockdown on HG-induced cell proliferation, differentiation and collagen accumulation in HCFs

HCFs were transfected with si-TGFBR2 or si-NC, and then treated with 5.5 or 25 mM glucose for 24 h. (A) The protein expression of TGFBR2 was determined by Western blot. α-Tubulin was detected as a loading control. (B) Cell proliferation was assessed by Brdu-ELISA assay. (C) The mRNA level of α-SMA was determined by qRT-PCR. (D) The mRNA levels of collagen I, III and VI were determined by qRT-PCR. All data are presented as mean ± S.E.M. (n=4). **P<0.01, #P<0.05, ##P<0.01 compared with control or HG + si-NC.

Inhibition of TGFBR2 is essential for protective effect of miR-9 on HG-induced cardiac fibrosis in HCFs

Next, to determine whether miR-9 overexpression protected HCFs from HG-induced cardiac fibrosis in an TGFBR2-dependent manner, we cotransfected HCFs with miR-9 mimic and pcDNA-TGFBR2. We found that the expression of TGFBR2 was significantly increased after transfection with miR-9 mimic and pcDNA-TGFBR2 compared with miR-9 mimic and pcDNA3.1 in HCFs (Figure 6A). Analysis by Brdu-ELISA assay indicated that down-regulation of TGFBR2 in cells transfected with the miR-9 mimic decreased HG-induced the proliferation of HCFs by up-regulation of miR-9 (Figure 6B). Moreover, the results also showed that up-regulating TGFBR2 expression could reverse the protective effect of miR-9 overexpression on HG-induced cardiac fibrosis in HCFs (Figures 6C and 6D). From all above results, we clearly demonstrated that up-regulation of miR-9 improved HG-induced increases in cell proliferation, differentiation and collagen synthesis of HCFs by down-regulation of TGFBR2, and that inhibition of TGFBR2 was essential for the protective effect of miR-9 overexpression HG-induced cardiac fibrosis in HCFs.

TGFBR2 was involved in the effects of miR-9 on HG-induced cell proliferation, differentiation and collagen accumulation in HCFs

Figure 6
TGFBR2 was involved in the effects of miR-9 on HG-induced cell proliferation, differentiation and collagen accumulation in HCFs

HCFs were transfected with either miR-9 mimic with pcDNA-TGFBR2 or pcDNA3.1, and then treated with 5.5 or 25 mM glucose for 24 h. (A) The protein expression of TGFBR2 was determined by Western blot. α-tubulin was detected as a loading control. (B) Cell proliferation was assessed by Brdu-ELISA assay. (C) The mRNA level of α-SMA was determined by qRT-PCR. (D) The mRNA levels of collagen I, III and VI were determined by qRT-PCR. All data are presented as mean ± S.E.M. (n=4). **P<0.01, ***P<0.001 compared with HG + miR-9 mimic + pcDNA3.1 or control; #P<0.05, ##P<0.01, ###P<0.001 compared with vehicle + HG; &P<0.05, &&P<0.01 compared with HG + miR-9 mimic.

Figure 6
TGFBR2 was involved in the effects of miR-9 on HG-induced cell proliferation, differentiation and collagen accumulation in HCFs

HCFs were transfected with either miR-9 mimic with pcDNA-TGFBR2 or pcDNA3.1, and then treated with 5.5 or 25 mM glucose for 24 h. (A) The protein expression of TGFBR2 was determined by Western blot. α-tubulin was detected as a loading control. (B) Cell proliferation was assessed by Brdu-ELISA assay. (C) The mRNA level of α-SMA was determined by qRT-PCR. (D) The mRNA levels of collagen I, III and VI were determined by qRT-PCR. All data are presented as mean ± S.E.M. (n=4). **P<0.01, ***P<0.001 compared with HG + miR-9 mimic + pcDNA3.1 or control; #P<0.05, ##P<0.01, ###P<0.001 compared with vehicle + HG; &P<0.05, &&P<0.01 compared with HG + miR-9 mimic.

DISCUSSION

Excess collagen deposition that is caused by increased synthesis or decreased degradation of collagen and cell proliferation are the main pathophysiological mechanisms underlying diabetic cardiomyopathy [25,26]. In the present study, we studied the effects of miR-9 on cell viability and proliferation of HG-treated HCFs. The promoted effect on viability and proliferation of HCFs induced by HG was abolished by up-regulation of miR-9, suggesting the protective function of miR-9 overexpression in HG-induced cardiac fibrosis.

The differentiation of CFs to myofibroblasts that is strongly enhanced in the myocardium of failing hearts with increased expression of α-SMA and formation of disorganized collagen matrix is one of the critical events in cardiac remodelling [27]. Our findings showed that miR-9 overexpression could inhibit the HG-induced differentiation of HCFs. Moreover, the ECM mainly consists of many collagens such as types I, III and VI, which form fibrils and provide most of the connective material and other structures in the myocardium [28]. A previous study had demonstrated that collagen I and III regulate proliferation of CF whereas collagen VI induces differentiation of CF. In the present study, we found that miR-9 overexpression inhibited HG-induced synthesis of collagen I, III and VI in HCFs. Taken together, our findings indicated that miR-9 up-regulation reversed HG-induced proliferation, differentiation and collagen synthesis of HCFs, resulting in protecting HG-induced cardiac fibrosis.

Recently, miRNAs are identified as the important regulators, which contribute to regulation of multiple biological processes including fibrosis [1315]. It has been reported that a number of the miRNAs play crucial roles in cardiac fibrosis, and different miRNAs have contrary functions [1621]. For example, overexpression of miR-101a significantly inhibited cardiac fibrosis induced by H2O2 via targeting TGFBRI [20]. Nagpal et al. [19] demonstrates that miR-215b is critical for induction of cardiac fibrosis, and act as a potent repressor of multiple anti-fibrotic mechanisms. Up-regulation of miR-503 promotes cardiac fibrosis through miR-503-Apelin-13-TGF-β-CTGF-collagen production pathway [18]. A previous study showed that miR-9 negatively regulated HG-induced cardiac fibrosis by targeting PDGFR-β [22]. However, there has been no report on whether miR-9 is differentially expressed in pathological HCFs, or if there are any functional roles of miR-9 in regulating HG-induced cardiac fibrosis. In the present study, we demonstrated that the level of miR-9 was evidently down-regulated in HCFs during the process of HG-induced cardiac fibrosis. Most importantly, our results showed that miR-9 up-regulation inhibited HG-induced viability and proliferation of HCFs. Thus, this is the first report to show differential expression of miR-9 and the functional role of miR-9 in HG-induced cardiac fibrosis.

TGF-β1 is identified as a profibrotic cytokine that induces the expressions of many ECM proteins such as collagens [29]. Moreover, TGF-β has been also confirmed to play an important role in pulmonary and myocardial fibrosis, by stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of fibroblasts [30,31]. TGF-β interacts with transmembrane receptors such as type I (TGFBR1), type II (TGFBR2) and type III (TGFBR3) to mediate its effects. In these three types of receptors, only TGFBR2 can bind TGF-β, and then it recruits and phosphorylates TGFBR1 [32]. Liang et al. [30] has reported that miR-153 has anti-fibrotic effect on TGF-β1-treated pulmonary fibroblasts by down-regulation of TGFBR2. And another paper showed that increased expression of miR-9-5p abrogated TGF-β1-dependent myofibroblast phenotypic transformation via down-regulation of TGFBR2 [33]. In the present study, we found that HG-induced cardiac fibrosis was closely related to up-regulation of TGFBR2 expression. Moreover, HG-induced TGFBR2 expression was down-regulated by miR-9 up-regulation. Next, down-regulation of TGFBR2 had the similar protective effects as miR-9 overexpression, whereas the protective effects of miR-9 up-regulation were partially abolished by transfection with pcDNA-TGFBR2. Taken together, these outcomes confirmed that up-regulation of miR-9 protected HCFs from HG-induced cardiac fibrosis by targeting TGFBR2.

Our findings showed that up-regulation of miR-9 ameliorates HG-induced proliferation, differentiation and collagen accumulation of HCFs by down-regulation of TGFBR2. These results provide further evidence for protective effect of miR-9 overexpression on HG-induced cardiac fibrosis.

AUTHOR CONTRIBUTION

Jiaxin Li, Yingnan Dai and Zhendong Su carried out the studies and the data statistics, and Guoqian Wei drafted the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Abbreviations

     
  • CCK-8

    Cell Counting Kit-8

  •  
  • CF

    cardiac fibroblast

  •  
  • GAPDH

    glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase

  •  
  • HG

    high glucose

  •  
  • α-SMA

    α-smooth muscle actin

  •  
  • TGF-β1

    transforming growth factor-β1

  •  
  • TGFBR2

    transforming growth factor-β receptor type II

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