To investigate the effect of changes in sex hormone concentration on muscle strength and the bioavailability of 17-β oestradiol (oestradiol) and testosterone, seven eumenorrheic females were tested during two phases of the menstrual cycle. Maximum voluntary isometric strength of the first dorsal interosseus muscle was measured during the early follicular and mid-luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. These phases were chosen for testing as the concentration of total oestradiol is significantly different in these two phases. Total oestradiol has been repeatedly associated with changes in muscle strength in females, whereas the effects of bioavailable oestradiol are unknown. The concentrations of total and bioavailable oestradiol and testosterone were measured in addition to the concentration of total progesterone. Concentrations of total progesterone and oestradiol were significantly different between the early follicular and mid-luteal phases of the menstrual cycle (P<0.05 and P<0.001 respectively). The concentration of total testosterone (0.7±0.2 and 0.8±0.1 nmol·l-1 respectively) and the ratio of total oestradiol to progesterone (153.0±251.2 and 108.5±27.8 respectively) did not change significantly between the early follicular and mid-luteal phases. Bioavailable testosterone (102.2±66.3 and 105.0±90.2 pmol·l-1 respectively) and bioavailable oestradiol (90.5±35.5 and 120.0±60.6 pmol·l-1 respectively) did not differ significantly between phases. There were no significant differences in muscle strength during the menstrual cycle (P=0.1). Mean maximum voluntary isometric force of the first dorsal interosseus muscle did not correlate significantly with the mean concentration of any reproductive hormone measured. These results indicate that cyclical variation in endogenous reproductive hormones does not affect muscle strength.

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