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Issues

ISSN 0143-5221
EISSN 1470-8736

Review Articles

Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 1763–1780.
Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 1781–1799.
Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 1923–1940.

Commentaries

Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 1919–1922.
Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 2059–2062.

Research Articles

Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 1801–1814.
Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 1815–1829.
Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 1831–1840.
Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 1841–1857.
Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 1859–1876.
Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 1877–1893.
Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 1895–1904.
Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 1905–1917.
Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 1941–1953.
Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 1955–1969.
Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 1971–1987.
Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 1989–2005.
Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 2007–2017.
Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 2019–2035.
Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 2037–2045.
Clin Sci (Lond) (2017) 131 (15): 2047–2058.
  • Cover Image

    Cover Image

    issue cover
    Human vascular smooth muscle cell derived from a skin precursor. Subjects with type-2 diabetes have fewer skin-derived precursors in their skin. Vascular smooth muscle cells derived from skin-derived precursors from subjects with type-2 diabetes carry persistent signatures of disease even weeks after being removed from the patient. Thus, skin-derived precursors may be a promising platform to study type-2 diabetes associated vascular disease in a dish. In Clinical Science volume 131, issue 15, Steinbach et al. describe new approach to studying human vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) pathophysiology by examining VSMCs differentiated from progenitors found in skin (see pages 1801-1814).
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